Advocacy, education and outreach in support of Vancouver's public spaces

By VPSN Blog

April 14, 2017 at 10:00 AM

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Hidden treasures: New boardwalk brings you closer to Camosun Bog

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New boardwalk extension through southeastern grove at Camosun Bog. Photo: Naomi Reichstein

New boardwalk extension through southeastern grove at Camosun Bog. Photo: Naomi Reichstein

By Naomi Wittes Reichstein, communications coordinator, VPSN

Looking for something to do in Vancouver this weekend that’s entirely satisfying, but you don’t have lots of time? There’s good news in town if you’re a lover of murky wetlands, especially ones that never look the same no matter how many times you visit.

The Camosun Bog must be in the running as one of the greatest of Vancouver’s underestimated small-scale treasures. It’s an ever-changing tapestry of reds, golds and chartreuse, a nest of sphagnum moss within the darker Pacific Spirit fir forest, with a soundtrack of bird calls and occasional frog ribbits.

Colours in early spring, Camosun Bog. Photo: Naomi Reichstein

Colours in early spring, Camosun Bog. Photo: Naomi Reichstein

Until this point, whenever you wanted to have an exploratory stroll or do a walking meditation there – and I’ve done both – you’d encircle the bog by staying on its perimeter boardwalk, which is several feet above water level with wooden guardrails on both sides.

Now, a new little extension through the bog’s southeastern grove takes you to an unrailed deck right at the water’s surface, bringing you into more direct engagement with what’s growing or living there. The idea is to allow closer observation of “plants such as arctic starflower [and] sundew,” offering more accessibility so that you can “see, smell and touch the bog,” in the words of the Camosun Blog Restoration Group.

Camosun Bog boardwalk extension takes you right to the water's surface. Photo: Naomi Reichstein

Deck expansion takes you right to the water’s surface. Photo: Naomi Reichstein

The extension gives you the feeling of moving into a more secluded, semi-wooded zone, as if you were in a Japanese garden. The kids will like it.

Just one heads-up: dogs aren’t allowed on the new extension, though there’s no problem walking them around the main boardwalk.

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